Finding Your Passion: Career Testing

Associate Director of Clinical Recruitment and Resources Dr. Jessica Genet, PhD explores the importance of finding a passion; whether that includes hobbies, extracurricular activities, a major in college, or a career path. Career assessments and further exploration in therapy allow clients to understand their preferences, values and interests, and offers guidance toward following a true passion.  

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“Individuals working to break free from the tangle of eating disorders need to find their passions in life… By passions I mean something external that gives the individual enjoyment, positive structure, or a pathway to self-knowledge.”
– Ira M Sacker, M.D., Author of “Regaining Your Self”

At Oliver-Pyatt Centers, we strive to help our patients explore their passions and live a more meaningful life. Unfortunately, the eating disorder is often so preoccupying and all-consuming that it interferes with the process of exploring interests and engaging in fun activities. Some of our clients struggle to find a job, a major in college, hobbies or extracurricular activities that bring them true enjoyment. Other clients have chosen paths and activities that “look good” externally (and bring them praise from family and friends) but are internally unrewarding. With these struggles in mind, all aspects of our treatment at Oliver-Pyatt Centers, from therapy sessions and yoga classes to outings in the community, aim to help our patients find their passions, explore new activities, and find what brings them true happiness.

One particularly unique service we offer at Oliver-Pyatt Centers is the opportunity to complete a career assessment. Career assessments are designed to help individuals understand their preferences, values and interests, and offers guidance towards selecting majors in school, jobs, career paths, and hobbies that are motivating and rewarding. Are you a person who tends to make decisions based on personal values or are you someone who tends to make decisions based on logic? Are you a person who prefers working on teams or prefers accomplishing tasks independently? Are you excited about activities that require self-expression and creativity? Are you interested in the helping professions such as teaching? These are just some of the questions a career assessment will explore. It is important to understand that a career assessment is not a magic eight ball and will not spit out an answer like “you must become a teacher.” Instead, it offers a springboard for discussion on these topics, leaving plenty of space for personal reflection and choice. Career assessments offer more than guidance on career or job choices; many of our clients describe the experience as an opportunity for self-discovery. We are delighted to provide this service to our clients.

For more information about Oliver-Pyatt Centers please call 866.511.HEAL (4325), visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram

Featured Recipe: Chicken Curry with Vegetables

We appreciate an easy to create weekday staple meal, particularly one that warms the body and soul during these chilly, winter nights. Shared by Social Media and Marketing Manager Greer Findura, MS, this chicken curry recipe can be made ahead and stored for quick preparation throughout the week. Pair with a serving of rice for a complete entree. We are always looking for new meal and snack ideas; if you have any favorite recipes you would like to share with us, please send them to stayconnected@oliverpyattcenters.com

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Chicken Curry with Vegetables

Ingredients
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
3 tablespoons red Thai curry paste
1 yellow onion, sliced with the grain
2 chicken breasts, cut into cubes
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 1/2 cups broccoli florets
1 1/2 cups chopped carrots
1 teaspoon dried basil
3 cloves garlic, minced
Zest of 1/2 lime
1 1/4 cups coconut milk
1/4 cup chicken stock
One 14-ounce can diced tomatoes
Lime wedges, for squeezing

Directions
Cook 1 tablespoon of the oil, the curry paste and onions in a large saute pan over medium heat, stirring often and letting sizzle, 5 to 6 minutes. Pat the chicken dry, sprinkle with salt and pepper and add the remaining oil to the pan. Cook the chicken in the onion-curry mixture until golden on all sides. Add the broccoli, carrots, basil, garlic and lime zest and cook, stirring, until the vegetables are coated, about 2 minutes. Add the coconut milk, chicken stock and tomatoes and bring to a simmer. Let the chicken simmer until cooked through and the sauce begins to thicken, about 20 minutes. Squeeze with lime juice before serving.

For more information about Oliver-Pyatt Centers please call 866.511.HEAL (4325), visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram

Recipe courtesy of Food Network.

CDC Responds to EDC Advocates

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Over the weekend, the Eating Disorders Coalition (EDC) received a formal response from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to the Dear Colleague letter regarding BMI screening and surveillance in schools. As quoted by the EDC, “the response is AWESOME!!!” Please see the full article and penned response here

The CDC listened to the EDC’s call to utilize evidence-based practices to address the childhood obesity epidemic. And, although the CDC states they do not support the use of BMI testing in the prevention of childhood obesity, they realize this testing does occur in some schools and have agreed to provide risk and safeguard information to ensure the wellbeing and protect the privacy and confidentiality of students. Additionally, the CDC continues to stress the need for additional research in this area.

At Oliver-Pyatt Centers, we take advocacy work very seriously and know that you, our readers, also appreciate the magnitude of using your voice to pioneer these much needed changes in government and administration. “The results of our collective advocacy made a huge difference! Together, as a coalition, we did what EDC advocates have been doing so well together since 2000: We noticed a problem; we educated people about the problem; we shared personal stories to highlight the problem; we advocated for change using our power in numbers at EDC National Lobby Day/Virtual Lobby Day; and we respectfully dialogued with the appropriate people to seek out results that are viable and sustainable.” (Eating Disorders Coalition)

We want to join the EDC in thanking each and every one of you who continue to work toward educating others about eating disorder treatment and recovery, providing this much needed care, and advocating for and with those who are striving toward recovery.

For more information about Oliver-Pyatt Centers please call 866.511.HEAL (4325), visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram